Mindfulness

Meditation and mindfulness training are good for everybody, but they are especially great for IBD patients. IBD can be extremely stressful at times, especially for students and those with full-time careers. Meditation and mindfulness help people to find peace and calmness. I have used meditation and other forms of mindfulness training to help me deal with the stress of IBD, and I found that the best part of mindfulness is that it only takes a few minutes a day to calm down and release your stress.

According to a study conducted by Wolters Kluwer Health, mindfulness can bring long-lasting improvements in mental health and quality of life for patients with IBD. The researchers tested patients after eight weekly group sessions and an additional day-long intensive session. The sessions included guided meditation, mindfulness exercises, and group discussions of challenges and experiences. Patients were also encouraged to perform daily meditation at home. Those who completed the program experienced lower anxiety and depression scores and improved physical and psychological quality of life. They also had more awareness of inner and outer experiences. Six months later, they continued to experience a significant reduction in depression and improvement in quality of life.

While mindfulness training clearly helps to improve the mental health of IBD patients, it could also improve their physical health. Sometimes, stress can cause one to relapse into a flare up; if patients can reduce stress through mindfulness training, they may be able to prevent flare ups.

Obviously, not everyone has the time to go through as intense a program as the subjects in the study did. However, you can still practice mindfulness at home. I find meditation to be the most helpful for me. I use the Calm app to meditate, and I’ve heard Headspace is another great app for meditation.

Remember that small habits can lead to big changes in your life. See if daily acts of mindfulness can change your life.

 

 


Dealing with Depression and Anxiety

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a painful and upsetting disease that can change how you live your life. The pain, bleeding, and other severe symptoms associated with IBD often lead to depression and anxiety. IBD can isolate you from the rest of the world, causing you to feel lonely and unheard. 

Recognizing the signs of depression and anxiety that may accompany IBD is essential for dealing with these feelings. Severe sadness, suicidal thoughts or actions, tiredness, loneliness, and a lack of desire to do anything at all usually indicate you are suffering from depression. If you feel you are nervous all the time, shaky, guilty, or suffer from panic or anxiety attacks, you are most likely suffering from anxiety. Since IBD and mental disorders go hand in hand, they need to be taken more seriously, especially among teenagers. 

Although it may sound difficult, one of the best ways of dealing with feelings of depression and anxiety is to talk to your parent(s) or guardian(s) about how you are feeling. Talking to a parent or guardian can help you work through the emotional pain, and they may be able to find professional help for you. If you don’t feel comfortable approaching your parent(s) or guardian(s), then you can try to get help on your own. The internet offers many forums for people with IBD where people ask for advice. These forums create a community among IBD patients, and it lets them feel less alone. Other people suffering from the same disease completely understand what you may be going through. For people in need of support, communicating with people who have had or are having the same experiences can be comforting. You might also consider talking to your close friends about your disease, letting them know how it makes you feel. In addition to your family, your friends provide a system of support for you. They will help ensure you never feel alone as you battle this illness. 

When dealing with anxiety, it is crucial that you find ways to calm yourself down.  I have found that simply drinking cold water and lying down for a few minutes to catch my breath can be highly effective at calming me down. Reading a book, watching a movie, or listening to music can also help. Talking to others is another great option. You might also consider engaging in hobbies, which tend to preoccupy the mind and help you not feel as on edge about everything. Becoming happier is easier said than done, but finding happiness is possible. Find something to look forward to every single day, even if it’s as simple as drinking your favorite coffee in the morning. Always look for the good that happens in a day, and remember to keep fighting no matter how hard it may be. 

The most critical thing to remember is that if you really think something is wrong and you could potentially be a danger to yourself or to someone else, please seek professional help. You are not alone, and there are people out there who would love to help you. Do not wait to get help if you feel you are suffering from depression or anxiety as a result of your IBD. 

This article that I found is very helpful for individuals suffering from depression and IBD as it gives some simple tips on how to manage both your mental health and physical health. I also found some research on the prevalence of anxiety and depression in IBD patients, which gave me a lot of insight into just how common it is to suffer from mental health problems along with IBD.